Hoc Est Corpus Meum: Luther’s Reformation Gets Away From Him

Editor’s Note: This article is part of an October 2017 series of posts on the Reformation and Protestantism written by O&H authors and guest writers marking the 500th anniversary of the nailing of Martin Luther’s 95 theses to the church door at Wittenberg on October 31, 1517. Articles are written by Orthodox Christians and discuss not just the Reformation as a historical‚Ķ

Ancient Heresies in the Sixteenth Century I: The Nestorians

Editor’s Note: This article is part of an October 2017 series of posts on the Reformation and Protestantism written by O&H authors and guest writers marking the 500th anniversary of the nailing of Martin Luther’s 95 theses to the church door at Wittenberg on October 31, 1517. Articles are written by Orthodox Christians and discuss not just the Reformation as a historical‚Ķ

Do the Orthodox Have Confessions?

Editor’s Note: This article is part of an October 2017 series of posts on the Reformation and Protestantism written by O&H authors and guest writers marking the 500th anniversary of the nailing of Martin Luther’s 95 theses to the church door at Wittenberg on October 31, 1517. Articles are written by Orthodox Christians and discuss not just the Reformation as a historical‚Ķ

The Original Severe Protestant: The Prophetic Calvin

Editor’s Note: This article is part of an October 2017 series of posts on the Reformation and Protestantism written by O&H authors and guest writers marking the 500th anniversary of the nailing of Martin Luther’s 95 theses to the church door at Wittenberg on October 31, 1517. Articles are written by Orthodox Christians and discuss not just the Reformation as a historical‚Ķ

What John Calvin Really Thought about Icons in the Church

Editor’s Note: This article is part of an October 2017 series of posts on the Reformation and Protestantism written by O&H authors and guest writers marking the 500th anniversary of the nailing of Martin Luther’s 95 theses to the church door at Wittenberg on October 31, 1517. Articles are written by Orthodox Christians and discuss not just the Reformation as a historical‚Ķ

Why Would a Calvinist or a Baptist do Confession?

A friend shared this article today, in which one of the writers at The Gospel Coalition (a generally Reformed bunch of Evangelicals) laments the lack of confession in (his?) church: It is puzzling to see one of the defining marks of a Christian‚Äôs identity quietly disappear from a church‚Äôs worship. I‚Äôm speaking, of course, about confession ‚Äď a time when the church‚Ķ

Is Liturgy Magic? A Response to Peter Leithart’s Puritan Sacramentalism

I must admit that it always bugs me a bit when someone tells me what I believe, especially when I do not actually believe it. And so the bug in my bonnet buzzed again a bit when I read Peter Leithart’s latest musings on liturgy over at First Things. In this piece, Leithart lets the Orthodox, Roman Catholics and other “high church”‚Ķ

On Leithart’s Puritans and the Purity of Sacraments

Introduction In a recent article at¬†First Things, Peter Leithart laments the ‚Äúhigh-churchism‚ÄĚ of non-Protestant celebrations of the Eucharist. For Leithart, the essential difference between ‚Äúhigh‚ÄĚ and ‚Äúlow‚ÄĚ liturgies is that of the preparatory rites‚ÄĒnot necessarily the external ornaments of incense, bells, and vestments. Beyond mere simplicity, the Protestant or ‚ÄúPuritan‚ÄĚ sacramentalism was one that eschewed excessive and unnecessary foreplay: The low-church Reformers‚Ķ