How Light and Immortality Came to Light (Fri. Dec.11)

The word of the day is “immortality.”  In today’s reading, we hear St. Paul proclaim the Gospel that Christ has “brought life and immortality” to light.  Our reading of 2 Timothy 1:1-2, 8-18 is a glorious beginning of Paul’s second letter to the young Bishop Timothy of Ephesus.  The Orthodox Study Bible notes that according to tradition, this was probably Paul’s last letter before His martyrdom in Rome about 67 AD.  Paul himself says that his “departure” from this world is “at hand” (vs. 4:6). Paul begins his letter by recalling that God has both saved us and given us a holy calling (vs. 9).  Once again, he sounds his constant theme that salvation has come to the faithful by…

From Tent to Temple: the Resurrection of the Body (Sat. Nov. 7)

The word of the day is “resurrection”  In our reading of 2 Corinthians 5:1-10, St. Paul uses a metaphor to describe our hope of transformation from the corruptible physical body to the resurrection of the incorruptible body.  He states, “For we know that if our earthly house of this tabernacle were dissolved, we have a building of God, a house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens (vs. 1). Remember that in Plato’s Greek philosophy, the body is the “prison house of the soul.”  The body’s functions, such as five senses and the body’s sensations of pleasure and pain, are restraints to realizing the soul’s true nature.  Death is the release of the soul and its return to the…

The Glorious Resurrected Body and the Renewal of Creation (Sat. Oct. 10)

The word of the day is “incorruption.” In today’s reading of 1 Corinthians 15:39-45, we turn our attention from material things of the present to the futures’ spiritual things. In this passage, St. Paul speaks of our bodies’ transformation when God raises them from the dead. He writes that in the resurrection, “the body is sown in corruption, it is raised in incorruption” (vs. 42). The Glorious Resurrected Body The Apostle describes how glorious our recreated bodies will be (vs. 42-45).   Now they are subject to corruption; that is, they are infected with inevitable decay and destruction (Strong’s #5356 & 5351, 263).  They are dishonored; that is, they are debased with shame and indignity (Strong’s #819, 46). They are weak;…