Time and Exegesis: Reflections on Contemporary Orthodox Approaches to Scripture (Guest Post)

Today I’ve asked my friend, Dr. Miriam DeCock, to reflect on how time/temporality shapes her academic field of training. I first met Miriam when we both started teaching at the Orthodox School of Theology at Trinity College in Toronto. She’s since moved on to new opportunities (and is about to head off to a postdoc in Denmark!), so…

Death and Fire: An Icon of Modern Mortality

In the class I co-teach on death in Orthodox Tradition, last Thursday I lectured on the medicalization of death in the 20th century. To give us all a kind of anchor in the many complexities that affect how people die in modernity and beyond, I selected one of my favorite works of art as a kind of symbol…

Condemned or Redeemable? Thoughts about Internet and Ministry after the #DMOPC18 Symposium

As many of you know, I have recently returned from a trip to Greece, in which I participated in the Second International Symposium on Digital Media and Orthodox Pastoral Care, held from June 18-21 at the Orthodox Academy of Crete (of Great and Holy Council 2016 fame). The symposium was organized by Pemptousia, with support from various other…

Time and Hope in the Divine Comedy: A Guest Post by Maria Naasko

Today, I’m thrilled to share this guest post with you about depictions of time, eternity, and hope by Maria Naasko. I’m doubly excited because I LOVE giving a platform to young writers (Maria just graduated high school–congrats!). Maria has been a long-time reader and fan of Time Eternal; she told me that this forum has shaped her thinking…

The Slowness of Orthodoxy: What Slow TV and Our Faith Have in Common

Today on the Time Eternal blog, I’m featuring a guest post by Dr. Nic Hartmann, an Orthodox blogger and museum education director from Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He recently visited what sounds like an interesting and poignant exhibit that celebrated all things slow. Here, Nic reflects on the connections between slow culture and Orthodox practice. In my mind, this has…

Show notes for “Mennonites, Memory, and Marking Time”

Last month, I had tea with my friend Kerry, who was raised in a conservative Mennonite community in Blumenort (Manitoba). We talked about how the rhythms of time we learned in faith and childhood shape us long into adulthood. Feel free to make yourself a pot of tea and join us at the table! *** Not sure what…

The Rapture: An Orthodox Understanding (Infographic)

Fact #1: I grew up believing in the Rapture. Fact #2: I no longer believe in the Rapture. Really, I don’t. Fact #3: When I walk into a mysteriously empty room or a quiet home, my first (subconscious) instinct is still to check the floor for heaps of clothes and other telltale signs that people have been raptured.…

Why the World Has to End: Making Sense of the Apocalypse

  The apocalypse. Nowadays, it’s a term that serves as a shorthand for a movie-worthy, special-effects-laden vision of the end of the world as we know it. But apocalypticism is often a much deeper and more existentially fraught topic than it seems upon first glance. Going Back to the Apocalypse I wrote my MA thesis on currents of…

What if Christmas *Did* Come from a Pagan Festival?

While traveling on the subway the other day, I overheard an interesting conversation between two strangers.   “Actually,” one person began grumbling, “They don’t know when he was born. I mean, if Christ was so important, you’d think we’d at least know his birthday!” A second person responded with similar cynicism: “And plus, Christmas came from a pagan…