The Death of Democracy in the Death of Syria

The Death of Democracy in the Death of Syria

As the western war machine ramps up for a Syrian assault, one can’t help but wonder if the myth of democracy or a constitutional republic is finally dead in the American consciousness?

When the United States led a coalition assault on the nation of Iraq in 2003, it was perhaps one of the most popularly-supported campaigns in American history. Following the tragedy of 9/11, the nation was anxious for revenge, and an invasion of both Afghanistan and Iraq proved to be a much-needed tonic for the decaying American soul (at least for those who see revenge as a valid response to tragedy).

But was it really?

As time has carried on, it has been revealed—much to the dismay of many in the west—that the pretenses for war were entirely fabricated, and our war against Iraq was in no sense “just.”

Sure, one could say Saddam was an “evil man” and that he had committed a number of unthinkable acts, but we can’t simply wash our hands of these things. We were equally culpable, especially considering the fact that many of the weapons he used and the things he did over the years (both in and outside of Iraq) were done with covert, American approval and support. Cue video of Donald Rumsfeld shaking Saddam’s hand.

Iraq was clearly a mistake, not only from an American foreign policy standpoint, but also from a Christian one. A nation that was once thriving with Christianity under Saddam has now been all but abandoned by Christians. The statistics are, quite frankly, depressing. And this pattern has continued since Iraq.

In Libya, Egypt, and now Syria, the local Christian populations—minorities though they may be—are in real jeopardy of being completely wiped out.

In recent days, we’ve heard of dozens of monasteries, churches, and Christian homes being destroyed across Egypt.

Two of the oldest monasteries in the world, that of St. Catherine’s at Mount Sinai and that of St. Thekla in Syria, are in danger of being desecrated by Islamic extremists, while the monks are on the brink of starvation.

Women and children in majority-Christian towns throughout Syria are being slaughtered, while their homes are burned to the ground.

In Egypt, the face of the enemy is the Muslim Brotherhood, and in Syria, Al Qaeda and other extremist groups, which have all falsely been termed the Free Syrian Army (F.S.A.) or “Syrian rebels” by western-backed media. In both cases, they are operating with American support and working towards American goals. It is abundantly clear by now that these goals in no way involve the protection of Christians.

The prospect of a “limited” American strike on Syria has emerged as the least-popular and most widely opposed American offensive in the history of the nation. The opinion polls vary, but it is clear that this is in no way supported by the majority of the American people. If America would continue to “hang its hat” on this myth called democracy, how can one do so with a straight face, knowing that it is highly possible that our “representatives” will approve of something that the vast majority of their constituents oppose? How, and in what sense, are they really our “representatives” at this point? Democracy is damned.

The reality is starting to bubble to the surface, and even for those who would normally be the first to rally behind yet another American conflict: our country is actually an oligarchy, quickly trending towards totalitarianism.

Say what you will about the powers of the executive branch, if the interests of the President and Congress are more so the interests of businesses such as Boeing and Raytheon—as opposed to the actual American people—then there is no other word for it. As John Adams once said:

Remember, democracy never lasts long. It soon wastes, exhausts, and murders itself. There never was a democracy yet that did not commit suicide.

It is abundantly clear that the will of the people is not being carried out in America. As such, we are in no sense of the word a “democracy.” On the other hand, we are in no sense of the word a “republic” if our representatives fail to actually represent the interests of their voting supporters. Instead, we are—at best—an oligarchy, run and led by the interests of defense contracts and oil profiteering. Tragically, things are perhaps even worse than they seem.

The true terror and tyranny is not in Syria, Libya, Iraq, or Egypt. It is right here in America, and this terror is starting to penetrate the hearts and minds of those who normally bleed red, white, and blue without discernment or question. The veil has been removed; what will happen next?

G. V. Martini

About G. V. Martini

G. V. Martini works as a senior product manager for a software company and is a subdeacon in the Orthodox Church. He and his family attends St. Innocent Antiochian Orthodox Church in Everson, Washington.

News