St Paul’s Greek Orthodox Church, Savannah, GA

This postcard, of St. Paul’s Greek Orthodox Church in Savannah, Georgia, is from 1914, seven years after the parish acquired the church building. The Greek Orthodox community in Savannah didn’t have a name yet, but they purchased St. Paul’s Episcopal Church and decided that, hey, St. Paul is Orthodox, so let’s go with that. Also, this is one of the first documented instances of an Orthodox church with pews. The often-repeated story,…

Glimpses of Orthodoxy in Great Britain and America 1519-1917

This month got off to a hectic start with a week long trip to Great Britain. The main purpose of the trip was to promote the newly published work of Orthodox history in the West entitled Embassy, Emigrants, and Englishmen. One of the events in the week was a talk I gave at St Aidan’s Antiochian Orthodox Church in Manchester, giving an overview and glimpses of the development of Orthodoxy on both…

Five American Orthodox Priests Who Might Be Saints

Wherefore seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us… (Hebrews 12:1) One of the most exciting things about studying the history of Orthodoxy in America is discovering a holy person who’s been completely forgotten. It’s commonly — and correctly…

A Catechism and its Connections

On Thursday I travel to England to promote the publication of a book I have been editing for the past two years: Embassy, Emigrants and Englishmen, The Three Hundred Year History of a Russian Orthodox Church in London. It is a remarkable work and I think the first book to give a continuous narrative of Orthodox history in the West over several centuries. The center point of the book is London, but…

Archbishop Wasyl Sawyna and the Orthodox Cathedral of Emmaus, PA

Today is the 26th anniversary of the passing from this life of Archbishop Wasyl Sawyna (Feb. 24, 1893 – Oct. 13, 1988), primate of the Ukrainian Autocephalic Orthodox Church of North and South America, an uncanonical church with, as far as I can tell, only one church that it ever claimed. The picture above was his archepiscopal see—the Ukrainian Orthodox Cathedral of St. Basil the Great in Emmaus, Pennsylvania. At 840 square…

Who was St. Raphael under?

Over at Orthodox History today, I published an article addressing the fairly complicated question of which Church St. Raphael belonged to — Russia or Antioch. Spoiler alert: It’s kind of fuzzy. Read all about it HERE. Ultimately, that question ties into the broader issue of Orthodox unity in America at the turn of the last century. Until a few years ago, it was fairly commonplace to hear people say that all of…