Who was St. Raphael under?

Over at Orthodox History today, I published an article addressing the fairly complicated question of which Church St. Raphael belonged to — Russia or Antioch. Spoiler alert: It’s kind of fuzzy. Read all about it HERE. Ultimately, that question ties into the broader issue of Orthodox unity in America at the turn of the last century. Until a few years ago, it was fairly commonplace to hear people say that all of…

A Pan-Orthodox Liturgy in Chicago in 1934

On December 16, 1934, the Orthodox of Chicago held a landmark pan-Orthodox liturgy that included Greek and Russian Metropolia bishops, as well as clergy from the local Serbian and Romanian churches. Here’s an article on the liturgy from the Chicago Greek Daily (Dec. 9, 1934): Next Sunday, Dec. 16, 7:30 P.M., in the church of St. Constantine and Helene, will take place a Grand Vesper, in which the Most Rev. Kallistos of San Francisco,…

Unifying the Orthodox Church in the United States

Fr. Andrew Stephen Damick has an excellent new article today at First Things, where he discusses the problems and solutions of Orthodox Christian unity in America. Here’s an excerpt: Are you Greek?” This is the question I get asked the most when I tell someone that I am an Orthodox Christian. At first, this question rankled, because I am not Greek. (I am, among other things, Lithuanian.) Mind you, I would have…

A (very) short history of Orthodoxy in America

The History of Orthodoxy in America in Two Words: Immigrants. Converts. The History of Orthodoxy in America in Ten Words: Immigrants brought Orthodoxy and were joined by converts. Gradual acclimation. The History of Orthodoxy in America in One Hundred Words: Orthodoxy took root in America at the turn of the 20th century because of the immigration of Orthodox people from Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean and the mass conversion of Eastern Rite…