Some thoughts on St Raphael’s original chapel in New York

At Orthodox History, I just posted three images of St Raphael Hawaweeny’s original chapel in Manhattan, New York. It was an unassuming place — a small room on the second floor of a building, above a Syrian-owned store. As I observed in that article, the chapel isn’t much different than a typical storefront mission church today. I showed these pictures (well, the two photos, because I just discovered the sketch) to the…

A Timeline of the Life of St Raphael

Over at Orthodox History, I just posted a brief timeline of the life of St Raphael Hawaweeny. Click here to read it. I prepared that timeline as part of a series of lectures Sam Noble and I presented at the clergy brotherhood retreat for the Antiochian Diocese of Wichita and Mid-America this past week. The retreat was a wonderful experience, and it was a great privilege to be able to talk about…

Glimpses of Orthodoxy in Great Britain and America 1519-1917

This month got off to a hectic start with a week long trip to Great Britain. The main purpose of the trip was to promote the newly published work of Orthodox history in the West entitled Embassy, Emigrants, and Englishmen. One of the events in the week was a talk I gave at St Aidan’s Antiochian Orthodox Church in Manchester, giving an overview and glimpses of the development of Orthodoxy on both…

Who was St. Raphael under?

Over at Orthodox History today, I published an article addressing the fairly complicated question of which Church St. Raphael belonged to — Russia or Antioch. Spoiler alert: It’s kind of fuzzy. Read all about it HERE. Ultimately, that question ties into the broader issue of Orthodox unity in America at the turn of the last century. Until a few years ago, it was fairly commonplace to hear people say that all of…

We Must Have a Bishop

Over at Orthodox History today, I published a 1914 editorial from a Greek newspaper in Chicago, arguing that the Greek Orthodox in America needed their own bishop. (CLICK HERE to read it). Greek churches began proliferating in America in the 1890s, and by 1916 (two years after the editorial), there were 87 Greek parishes in America. Originally, these parishes got their priests from either the Church of Greece or the Ecumenical Patriarchate…

Unifying the Orthodox Church in the United States

Fr. Andrew Stephen Damick has an excellent new article today at First Things, where he discusses the problems and solutions of Orthodox Christian unity in America. Here’s an excerpt: Are you Greek?” This is the question I get asked the most when I tell someone that I am an Orthodox Christian. At first, this question rankled, because I am not Greek. (I am, among other things, Lithuanian.) Mind you, I would have…