A Song in the Furnace

I have been reading the Book of Daniel for many years since my conversion to Christ in 1970, which also means (a bit unfortunately) that I have been reading commentaries on the Book of Daniel for almost as long. The commentaries came in two contrasting flavours: liberal and conservative. The liberal commentaries delighted with a kind of perverse glee to point out all the historical problems and improbabilities found in the text,…

Deaconesses: Looking Down the Road to LMNOP

In this last February 2017, the Patriarchate of Alexandria ordained six “deaconesses” in the Congo, an action which was hailed by some as a courageous and much-needed step forward, and decried by others who warned that it was a dangerous step, tending to further unorthodox actions, such as the ordination of women to the priesthood and the erosion of Orthodox Tradition generally. As an example of the former, we may cite the…

Listening to Lessons from the Unborn

Good theology can pop up in unexpected places.  One such place is the writing of Dr. Seuss, writer of children’s books.  My favourite theological work of his is How the Grinch Stole Christmas, a story of conversion and redemption.   I also like his pro-life treatise, though it is doubtful that he considered it to be such when he wrote it.  It is called Horton Hears a Who, and contains the theological…

A Polemical Faith

Polemics has a rather bad name—perhaps not surprisingly, since it comes from the Greek word polemos, meaning “war”. Some people in particular are distressed when they see in Christian writers anything polemical or negative. Why, they ask, do these Christian writers have to denounce certain trends and ideas? Can’t we all just be positive, upbeat, and encouraging? After all, Jesus preached a Gospel of love. Can’t we just speak about things that…

A Continuing Kenosis

Our Lord’s baptism, though it formed the beginning of His public ministry when He first stepped upon the world stage (and thus was the first thing narrated in Mark’s Gospel, which focussed upon that verifiable and public ministry) was not the beginning of His descent among us, nor the end of it. Rather, His baptism was the middle movement of that descent, the second in a dramatic play of three kenotic acts.…

King Herod and the True Meaning of Christmas

Having observed the annual round of Christmas festivities in my culture for all of my sixty-three odd years, I have come to the conclusion that my culture knows absolutely nothing about the true meaning of Christmas. And this is not just because they have completely forgotten about Christ apart from the two times of the year when they publish articles in their newspapers and magazines waging war against Him (i.e. debunking the…