Time for a Song

My grandchildren are growing up in an odd world, much odder than grandpa could have imagined when he was their age. Much of the oddness and insanity in their Brave New World has to do with sexuality and gender. Their school system encourages them to regard homosexuality and lesbianism and all other possible combinations of coupling as equally legitimate and normal. It also encourages them from Kindergarten onward to choose their gender.…

Talking about Salvation in South Carolina

On Monday February 5 I will be flying to South Carolina to spend the following week and weekend with the good Orthodox people of South Carolina and Georgia and giving talks at Furman University and in the local parishes about the Orthodox understanding of soteriology.  The main talk will bear the provocative title, “Who Goes to Hell?” (their choice of title), with subsequent addresses expounding the Orthodox understanding of faith and what…

A Song in the Furnace

I have been reading the Book of Daniel for many years since my conversion to Christ in 1970, which also means (a bit unfortunately) that I have been reading commentaries on the Book of Daniel for almost as long. The commentaries came in two contrasting flavours: liberal and conservative. The liberal commentaries delighted with a kind of perverse glee to point out all the historical problems and improbabilities found in the text,…

Deaconesses: Looking Down the Road to LMNOP

In this last February 2017, the Patriarchate of Alexandria ordained six “deaconesses” in the Congo, an action which was hailed by some as a courageous and much-needed step forward, and decried by others who warned that it was a dangerous step, tending to further unorthodox actions, such as the ordination of women to the priesthood and the erosion of Orthodox Tradition generally. As an example of the former, we may cite the…

Listening to Lessons from the Unborn

Good theology can pop up in unexpected places.  One such place is the writing of Dr. Seuss, writer of children’s books.  My favourite theological work of his is How the Grinch Stole Christmas, a story of conversion and redemption.   I also like his pro-life treatise, though it is doubtful that he considered it to be such when he wrote it.  It is called Horton Hears a Who, and contains the theological…

A Polemical Faith

Polemics has a rather bad name—perhaps not surprisingly, since it comes from the Greek word polemos, meaning “war”. Some people in particular are distressed when they see in Christian writers anything polemical or negative. Why, they ask, do these Christian writers have to denounce certain trends and ideas? Can’t we all just be positive, upbeat, and encouraging? After all, Jesus preached a Gospel of love. Can’t we just speak about things that…