Teaching Children to Love God

Children learn love of God by the example of their parents

Every Orthodox parent wants their children to grow up attending Sunday Liturgies and staying active in the life of the Church throughout their lives. Yet many parents don’t demonstrate the importance of having a personal relationship with God in front of their children. If you do not make God important, neither will your child.

Children observe their parents. They see hypocrisy and know when you are not following through with the teachings of the Church during the week. They hear when you take the Lord’s name in vain. They notice when you reserve prayer to weekend service. They notice you only speaking of God on a Sunday morning.

Making the sign of the cross, lighting candles and burning incense only on Sundays teaches your children to compartmentalize their own faith, and leaves them defenseless in a world fulled with temptations and distractions from things that are of a spiritual nature. If you do not demonstrate the importance of prayer before your children, you will leave them defenseless in a world that hates Christ. Your children need to pray with you, read the scriptures with you, be taught the faith by you.

If you do not make your home a domestic church, your children will be lost to Christ, and Orthodoxy will not be lived out beyond your own grave. If they do not see you living a committed life in Christ, they will turn from the faith, and Orthodoxy will not survive into the next generation.

Love in Christ,
Abbot Tryphon

Wednesday November 13, 2019 / October 31, 2019
22nd Week after Pentecost. Tone four.
Fast. By Monastic Charter: Strict Fast (Bread, Vegetables, Fruits)
Apostles Stachys, Amplias, Urban, Narcissus, Apelles, and Aristobulus of the Seventy (1st c.).
Martyr Epimachus of Pelusium, who suffered at Alexandria (250).
New Hieromartyr Priest John Kochurov of Chicago and St. Petersburg (1917).
New Hieromartyr Leonid (1918).
New Hieromartyrs Vsevolod, Alexander, Sergius, Alexis, Basil, Peter, Basil priests, Hieromartyrs Anatolius, Euphrosynus and Martyr James (1937).
New Hieromartyr Innocent (1938).
Venerables Spyridon and Nicodemus the Prosphorabakers of the Kiev Caves (1148).
Venerable Maura of Constantinople (436).
Venerable Anatolius, recluse of the Kiev Caves (12th c.).
New Martyr Nicholas the New of Chios (1754) (Greek).
Venerable Foillan, Irish monk-martyr (655) (Neth.).
Martyr Quentin of Rome (3rd-4th c.).
St. James, bishop of Mygdonia (4th. c.).
Commemoration of the Martyrs of Tbilisi slain under Jelaluddin (1227) (Georgia).
Martyr Epimachus the Roman and his companion Gordian (361-363) (Greek).
Martyrs Stephen, Barnabas, Trophimus, Dorymedon, Cosmas, Damian, Sabbas, Bassa, Abraham, and others with them (Greek).
Martyrs Seleucius and Stratonica his wife, myrr-gushers (Greek).

The Scripture Readings

Colossians 3:17-4:1

17 And whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through Him.

The Christian Home

18 Wives, submit to your own husbands, as is fitting in the Lord.

19 Husbands, love your wives and do not be bitter toward them.

20 Children, obey your parents in all things, for this is well pleasing to the Lord.

21 Fathers, do not provoke your children, lest they become discouraged.

22 Bondservants, obey in all things your masters according to the flesh, not with eyeservice, as men-pleasers, but in sincerity of heart, fearing God. 23 And whatever you do, do it heartily, as to the Lord and not to men, 24 knowing that from the Lord you will receive the reward of the inheritance; for you serve the Lord Christ. 25 But he who does wrong will be repaid for what he has done, and there is no partiality.

Christian Graces; Final Greetings

4 Masters, give your bondservants what is just and fair, knowing that you also have a Master in heaven.

Luke 11:42-46

42 “But woe to you Pharisees! For you tithe mint and rue and all manner of herbs, and pass by justice and the love of God. These you ought to have done, without leaving the others undone. 43 Woe to you Pharisees! For you love the best seats in the synagogues and greetings in the marketplaces. 44 Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you are like graves which are not seen, and the men who walk over them are not aware of them.”

45 Then one of the lawyers answered and said to Him, “Teacher, by saying these things You reproach us also.”

46 And He said, “Woe to you also, lawyers! For you load men with burdens hard to bear, and you yourselves do not touch the burdens with one of your fingers.

Abbot Tryphon

About Abbot Tryphon

The Very. Rev. Abbot Tryphon All-Merciful Saviour Monastery on Vashon Island, Washington. The Monastery is under the omophore of The Most Rev. Archbishop Kyrill of San Francisco and Western America, of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia. Situated in the heart of a beautiful forest, surrounded by the Salish Sea, the monastery is reached by ferry from either Seattle, or Tacoma, Washington.

3 comments:

  1. I love the pictures or icons I see of Jesus with all the little children around Him. I like to see myself as one of them….they must feel so secure and peaceful!

    God bless…..

  2. Yes , the “Ol’ Standard” Proverbs 22:6 comes to mind -“Train up a child in the way he should go, And when he is old he will not depart from it.”
    Seen this play out in my own family , and if one spouse is not ardent for the faith(as was in my case) , you’ve got your work cut out for you.
    He gives more grace, Lord have mercy on those trying to bring up Godly children today.

    Blessed day, Father.

  3. I was raised Protestant. I eventually converted to Orthodoxy. I am the only one in my family who is Orthodox.
    My own parents had a daily routine. The last thing we did as a family was to read a chapter of the Bible together, in order from start to finish. My father usually did this. My mother read it in his absence. When he had a stroke, it took him a while to be able to read the Bible again but they continued the routine. Eventually, my dad passed away from cancer about 8 years ago.
    Every day, before my father left for work, they would pray together. This would be if he left in the morning or the evening and they were there together, because he often worked changing shifts.
    At one point, my mother started working, and my dad’s shift changed to a more steady one, so they changed their daily routine to one of prayer before bedtime; this was after I had graduated high school.
    They would get on their knees at their bed, put their hands together, bow their heads on the bed and pray silently. As a young child, I would often sit on the bed and just watch them pray.
    If my father worked an odd shift and he left for work with no one home, I am sure that he still prayed; if my mother wasn’t there when he left, and he was working a shift that ended after she went to bed, she would pray by herself before bed.
    It was a beautiful thing, to watch them pray together.

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