Weeds in the Garden

It’s just not my strength. Gardening, for me, usually ends in disaster! But not for my grandmother. When I was a boy I remember me and my brothers and cousins being conscripted to help Mawmaw “put up” the vegetables from her garden. Corn and okra and green beans, and other produce was grown, harvested, canned, and stored so we’d have fresh vegetables to eat all year long.

It amazed me she could do all this. Of course, she came from a generation where growing your own food was just part of surviving. She and Pawpaw lived through the Depression, and they saved everything! It makes me wonder what our modern generation would do if they had to revert to that kind of survival living!

I didn’t mind so much the picking and the harvesting of the vegetables. What I hated was the weeding! “Come on young’uns, let’s go pull weeds!” Worst sound of the summer!

Look at our lesson today in Matthew 13:24-30:

The Lord said this parable. “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to a man who sowed good seed in his field; but while men were sleeping, his enemy came and sowed weeds among the wheat, and went away. So when the plants came up and bore grain, then the weeds appeared also. And the servants of the householder came and said to him, ‘Sir, did you not sow good seeds in your field? How then has it weeds?’ He said to them, ‘An enemy has done this.’ The servants said to him, ‘Then do you want us to go and gather them?’ But he said, ‘No; lest in gathering the weeds you root up the wheat along with them. Let both grow together until the harvest; and at harvest time I will tell the reapers, Gather the weeds first and bind them in bundles to be burned, but gather the wheat into my barn.'”

When Jesus compares the Kingdom of God to anything in the Gospels, it’s important for us to understand that He is speaking very clearly and plainly to the people listening to Him. And these people were use to growing their food, so this parable really hit home to them. It may be a stretch for we moderns so removed from the agricultural way of our past to really grasp what the parable is saying.

So, let’s try this.

First, The Kingdom of God, the Rule of God, the place where God lives and is acknowledged as Lord; that kingdom can be understood as being like a Man Who planted good plants in His field. It is a powerful insight to see the Kingdom compared to the very earthy work of planting, tending, and harvesting. This clearly reveals that living a faithful life as a Christian in God’s Family isn’t magic or some kind of mere school where you gather information. No, this Kingdom is like the labor, the work of planting and tending and harvesting. And this Sower has planted Good Seed. By the way, that’s you and me!

But and enemy has snuck in, under the cover of darkness, and planted weeds along with the Good Seed. Of course, it’s easy to identify the devil here, but that would be too small. Press this further and this “enemy” planting “weeds” in the Farmer’s Garden is also everything that takes the sunshine, the nutrients of the soil, and the work of the Farmer and gives nothing back in return. The “weeds” only take the blessings of the Garden. They never produce anything nourishing.

Finally, while the weeds and the wheat will grow together in this Garden, there will come a Harvesting Day when the wheat will go one way and the weeds will go another!  So, you shouldn’t be surprised when you see “weeds” in the Lord’s Church, His Garden. And you should first look to the “weeds” growing in your own heart and tend to them before the Harvest Day through repentance and devotion!

Today, where are the unproductive weeds in your heart and life? Can you tell the difference between the weeds and the wheat, what is productive and nourishing and what is only taking your life in a wasted way? By allowing the Lord of the Harvest to tend to your life through the wisdom of the Kingdom of God, the Church, you will find the soil of your life producing the fruit of your focused attention on being Orthodox on Purpose!

2 comments:

  1. Great reading. Thank you. And yes, I agree that “Come on young’uns, let’s go pull weeds!” was the worst sound of the summer! There were so many more exciting things to do in the summer!
    After reading your message, I was asking myself why hasn’t the householder ordered the servants to pick the weeds. “The servants said to him, ‘Then do you want us to go and gather them?’ But he said, ‘No; lest in gathering the weeds you root up the wheat along with them.” So why? After some checking, I found that some versions of the NT use the word darnel instead of weeds. The darnel, the weed referred to, looks like wheat. It even has a head similar to wheat. When the plant is young, it is almost impossible to distinguish it from wheat. Only when its fruit, or the lack of fruit, a head without grain, is seen, can it be separated from the wheat and burned. After reading this, I am struck down with the thought – “OK, am I bearing fruit?” Your closing comments are right on the button. Thanks.

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